PATIENT INFORMATION SHEETS
CHRIS SERVANT
ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT (ACL) RECONSTRUCTION

What is the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)?
The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is one of the four major ligaments that stabilise the knee joint. Ligaments are strong bands of fibrous tissue that hold joints together. About as thick as a little finger, the ACL passes across the centre of the knee joint and connects the end of the femur (thigh bone) with the top of the tibia (shin bone).
The ACL prevents the outer part of the tibia from sliding forward during twisting actions.
Knee anatomy

How is the ACL injured?
The ACL is commonly injured whilst playing running ball sports (such as football, rugby or volleyball) or whilst skiing. During ball sports the knee twists on sidestepping, pivoting or landing from a jump. During skiing the ACL may be injured during a fall at low or high speeds and often the binding fails to release.
The ACL either tears or pulls away from the bone. Normally the tear is a complete tear.
Typically patients hear or feel a "pop" and this is accompanied by pain. Usually, but not always, the knee swells rapidly as a result of bleeding within the joint from the torn ends of the ACL. As a rule, a torn ACL does not heal.
Sometimes the medial (inner) ligament is also partly torn (or sprained) and pain can be felt on the inner side of the knee. Additional injuries include a tear of a cartilage (or meniscus) and damage to the joint surfaces.
ACL tear
 

KNEE REPLACEMENT

KNEE ARTHROSCOPY

ACL RECONSTRUCTION

KNEE EXERCISES

HIP REPLACEMENT

HIP EXERCISES

SHOULDER ARTHROSCOPY

SHOULDER STABILISATION

SHOULDER EXERCISES
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